College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Home
  • Academics
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Certificate

Medieval and Early Modern Studies Certificate

Overview:

The purpose of the Graduate certificate program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) is to enhance the interdisciplinary preparation and professionalization of graduate students in a broad spectrum of departments in, or allied to, the Humanities, as well as in the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (SLLC).  The certificate provides an opportunity at KU for graduate students to add a concentration in  Medieval Studies, Early Modern Studies, or a combination of both. 

Approved Spring 2018 Course Offerings

English 915 Seminar in Medieval Literature. Medieval Myths and Fantasies.   Professor Schieberle TR 11-12:15 (66045)

Some of the most popular and enduring contemporary mythological figures and fantasy works have their roots in medieval literature – King Arthur and Robin Hood, Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones. This seminar traces the styles, techniques, and modes that medieval writers used to infuse their works with mythological and fantastic qualities – such as mystical visions, prophecies, magic, faeries, and other supernatural elements. Texts may include BeowulfSir Gawain and the Green Knight and PearlSir OrfeoLe Morte D’Arthur, medieval adaptations of classical mythology, and selected Robin Hood narratives and visionary texts. At the same time, the course will introduce students more generally to the study of medieval literature and languages (most works will be taught in Modern English facing-page editions, which provide both the original and an accessible translation). No prior expertise with medieval materials is assumed.

Each of the course texts imagines a world of possibilities and limitations, and we will explore how those possibilities or limitations are shaped by the constraints of reality or the freedom of fantasy. Put another way, we will be concerned with how various elements of fantasy allow authors to work through real-world problems, imagined solutions, and ideals they could not explore in other genres. Topics to be investigated to address the driving questions of the course include the nature of history and its relationship to literature; the multicultural and progressive perspectives embraced by some medieval English writers; the roles of monsters, magic, and the divine; and the influence of Fortune and destiny versus human responsibility. We will also explore how current theoretical perspectives can enrich medieval studies – and the second half of the course will be largely determined by students’ interests and fields of study.

Students will have the option to focus their final research projects on medieval topics or explore how medieval texts and genres inform more modern conceptions of myth, fantasy, or even dystopian futuristic novels (it’s true: Lidia Yuknavitch’s 2017 Book of Joan, set in a post-Earth, post-gender space station is loosely based on the life and works of Christine de Pizan and Joan of Arc). Assignments will include one presentation, 3-4 response papers, and a major researched essay or creative project.

French 900: Key Moments of Transition in Renaissance France: Rabelais and Montaigne.   Professor Bruce Hayes

In this course we will read Rabelais’s Pantagruel, Gargantua, Tiers Livre, and Quart Livre, followed by a significant number of essays from Montaigne’s Essais. These two authors, considered the “bookends” of the Renaissance, serve to illustrate the radical differences to be found in the literature of the sixteenth century, from Rabelais’s often optimistic evangelical humanism to Montaigne’s growing skepticism. The notion of the “Renaissance” is rather problematic, as will become clear in this course. Rabelais’s heterogeneous work contains many elements more readily associated with the Middle Ages, while Montaigne’s self-explorations often fit more comfortably in the fractured context of modernité

Required texts: 
François Rabelais (Guy Demerson edition, Points) 
Pantagruel  Gargantua 
Tiers Livre 
Quart Livre 
Michel de Montaigne (Emmanuel Naya edition, Folio) 
Livres I, II et III 
Required work will include an in-class presentation and a substantial research paper. 

HA 510: Medieval Manuscripts and Early Printed Books.  Professor Hedeman 11:00 – 12:15 PM Monday and Wednesday

Students in HA 510 will study the history of the book from 300 to 1500 A.D., concentrating on the role of visual imagery in books and the place of books in medieval and renaissance culture. In addition to discussing the relation between text and image, and studying the stylistic contexts for ancient, medieval, and Renaissance illumination and early woodcut illustration, participants in this course will consider such additional topics as methods of book production, the development of cycles of illustration for religious and secular books, and the relationship between manuscripts and early printed books. Lectures and discussion will be supplemented by visits to the fine collection of manuscripts, printed books, and facsimiles in the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Western art history at the college level or consent of the instructor.

HA 527: Late Medieval Art in Italy.  Professor Areli Marina, Mondays and Wednesdays 9:30-10:45

This course examines the history of paintings, sculptures and buildings produced in Italy from c. 1250 to 1400. Important individual works, artists, and decorative complexes, such as Giotto's Scrovegni (Arena) Chapel, are analyzed in terms of their stylistic, geographical, social, historical, devotional, and literary contexts. Current theories and controversies pertinent to the history and study of 13th- and 14th-century Italian art are also addressed. Prerequisite: HA 100, HA 150, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. 

HA 706: Rupture, Renascence, Renovatio, Renaissance in Medieval Architecture.   Professor Areli Marina, Mondays 2:30-5:00

One of the ways in which the history of Western art has been organized is as a dialectical narrative in which the forms, themes, and aesthetic principles of ancient Greco-Roman visual culture are alternately rejected and revived. In this seminar, we will interrogate the idea of “renaissance” in Western culture by looking at how it has been used to characterize changes in Western European medieval architecture. Modern scholars refer to no fewer than four separate rebirths of this ancient artistic repertory in the course of the Middle Ages: the Carolingian renovatio (renewal) ca. 800 CE, the pan-European “Renaissance of the twelfth century,” the imperial revival of the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II, and the “proto-Renaissance” of fourteenth century Italy. And these in turn are differentiated from the “real” Renaissance, the so-called rebirth in art that began in fifteenth-century Florence. Through examination of the built environment from different periods, we will discover how medieval patrons, architects, and workshops exploited the architectural, sculptural, and pictorial heritage of the ancient world  in many different ways, demonstrating the reductiveness and inadequacy of the revival vs. survival model and the dynamism of the relationship between tradition and innovation.

I warmly welcome students of  art and architectural history, architecture, art, design, and ancient, medieval, and early modern European culture in general who are committed to looking and reading attentively and extensively,to  testing their intellectual limits, and to discussing ideas and artworks energetically and respectfuly. The course assumes that you will have a basic familiarity with the major contours of medieval art, architectural, or cultural history. Please send me an email at arelimarina@ku.edu if you are unsure whether the course is right for you

Course Requirements:
You are required to prepare for and participate in class discussion, to make class presentations, and to successfully complete all written assignments. Written assignments include short weekly response papers and a final research paper of circa 20-25 pages. You are also expected to present your semester’s research findings orally to the seminar, along with supporting visual materials. These presentations must take place on the designated day, barring grave and extraordinary circumstances.

 HA 760/995   Korea-Japan: Negotiating Art Old and New.  Professors Sherry Fowler & Jungsil Jenny Lee , Tuesdays, 2:30-5:00 p.m. 

This graduate seminar will explore artistic and cultural exchanges between Korea and Japan. Topics will include tomb paintings, Buddhist sculptures, ceramics, and 19th and 20th century paintings, through which we will explore how traditional works of art were discovered, researched, and conceptualized in modern Korea and Japan and how they inspired the contemporaneous art world. 

HIST 564 Medieval Russia.  Professor Eve Levin, Tuesdays/Thursdays 9:30-10:45

Political, economic, social, cultural, and religious developments of Russia from the beginnings of the Russian state in the 9th Century through the 17th Century
No knowledge of Russian is required, and there are no prerequisites for graduate students.

Spanish 961: Translation in late medieval Iberia.  Prof. I. J. Rivera, Monday & Wednesday, 3:00 -4:15 pm

The violence of translation resides in its very purpose and activity: the reconstitution of the foreign text in accordance with values, beliefs, and representations that pre-exist it in the target language, always configured in hierarchies of dominance and marginality, always determining the production, circulation, and reception of texts.  
- Lawrence Venuti, "Translation as a Social Practice: or, The Violence of Translation,"
Translation Perspectives 9 (1996): 196.

This seminar will focus on the activity and practice of translation in late medieval Iberia with a special emphasis on early printed texts produced for Iberian readers. Central to this seminar will be Venuti’s concept of translation and practice as exemplified in hisarticles and book, The Translator’s Invisibility: A History of Translation. (Routledge, 1995). In addition the seminar will utilize Coldiron’s Printers without Borders: Translation and Textuality in the Renaissance (Cambridge, 2015) and Francomano’s The Prison ofLove: Romance, Translation, and the Book in the Sixteenth-Century (Toronto, 2018) to ground Venuti’s theories within a larger European context.

The course will follow a seminar format in which students will take an active role in structuring and planning essential aspects of the class. Each student will write one long analytical/research paper on an original topic related to the course and will be responsible for oral reports on secondary materials and for directing one class session. The research paper should reflect theoretical and research interests of the individual members of the seminar.

Primary texts to be read:
Camus, La historia delos nobles caualleros Oliueros de Castilla y Artus d’Algarve (Burgos, Fadrique de Basilea, 1499)
Jean d’Arras, Ystorya de la linda Melosina (Tholosa, Parix and Cleblat, 1489)
La passion del eterno principe Jhesu (Burgos, Fadrique de Basilea, 1493)
La vida y historia del rey Apolonio (Zaragoza, Hurus, 1488)
San Pedro, Diego, Carcer d’amor. translated by Bernadí Vallmanyà. (Barcelona: Rosenbach, 1493).

For more information, contact Prof. Rivera at ijrivera@ku.edu

HA 595 Rembrandt (68259).  Professor Linda Stone Ferrier

This course will explore a chronological overview of Rembrandt’s art (paintings, prints and drawings) and critically assess relevant art historical scholarship on certain subjects and themes, which Rembrandt repeatedly depicted. Prerequisite: An appropriate introductory-level course in art history, or consent of the instructor.

HA 706/940 Seventeenth-Century Dutch Land- and Cityscapes (61062/61059).  Professor Linda Stone Ferrier

This seminar will explore issues of scholarly methodologies as much as art historical content in order to understand the challenges and issues raised by the interpretation of seventeenth-century Dutch landscapes and cityscapes. (Permission of instructor required.)

 

Certificate Requirements: 

The certificate is awarded to M.A. or Ph.D. students who successfully complete 4 graduate-level courses across disciplines (12 credits total) drawn from a list of available courses. Coursework must be approved by a MEMS advisor and include at least one course chosen from outside the student's department. No directed readings or independent studies will be accepted, but rarely-offered courses not listed below may be considered for approval.  The certificate cannot be awarded retroactively; application and enrollment in the certificate by the start of the final course to be counted is strongly advised.

English Courses

ENGL 610 The Literature of England to 1500 

ENGL 610 The Literature of England to 1500
A survey of the literature of medieval England (in translation). Capstone course. Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 620 Renaissance English Literature: _____ 
ENGL 620 Renaissance English Literature: _____
A broad view of literary works written between 1485 and 1660. Surveys may be offered with focus on a particular genre (poetry, drama, or prose), historical period (16th- or 17th-century literature), or group of authors (women writers). May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Capstone course. Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 633 Milton 
ENGL 633 Milton
A close reading of Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, and the minor poems, with illustrative selections of prose. Capstone course. Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 640 British Literature, 1600-1800: _____ 
ENGL 640 British Literature, 1600-1800: _____
Study of literary works from the Restoration and eighteenth century. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Capstone course. Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 707 Literary Criticism to 1800 
ENGL 707 Literary Criticism to 1800
An introduction to the major writings of literary criticism, in their historical context, from Plato and Aristotle to Samuel Johnson. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 710 Introduction to Old English 
ENGL 710 Introduction to Old English
A study of the grammatical features of the earliest form of written English, with readings in Old English prose and poetry. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 714 Middle English Literature 
ENGL 714 Middle English Literature
Reading of selected works in Middle English (exclusive of the works of Chaucer). LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 720 Chaucer: _____ 
ENGL 720 Chaucer: _____
Intensive study of either the Canterbury Tales or Troilus and Criseyde and the earlier poems. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of six hours. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 725 Shakespeare: _____ 
ENGL 725 Shakespeare: _____
Intensive study of selected plays. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 730 Topics in Early Modern Literature: _____ 
ENGL 730 Topics in Early Modern Literature: _____
Intensive study of texts written between 1485 and 1800. The course may be organized around a particular genre (poetry, prose, drama), historical period (e.g. Elizabethan literature), a major author (e.g. Milton), group of authors (e.g. women writers), or theme (e.g. literature and politics 1660-1800). Students will be expected to read and apply relevant criticism and theory as well as study primary texts. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 785 History of the English Language 
ENGL 785 History of the English Language
Historical study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and semantics of English; the relation between linguistic and cultural change. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 915 Seminar in Medieval English Literature: _____ 
ENGL 915 Seminar in Medieval English Literature: _____
Study may center on either Old or Middle English language and literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Schieberle, Misty
TuTh 11:00-12:15 PM WES 3001A - LAWRENCE
3 66045

ENGL 916 Seminar in Chaucer: _____ 
ENGL 916 Seminar in Chaucer: _____
Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 920 Seminar in Renaissance English Literature: _____ 
ENGL 920 Seminar in Renaissance English Literature: _____
Close study of one or two major authors or of a group of related works. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ENGL 932 Seminar in Milton: _____ 
ENGL 932 Seminar in Milton: _____
Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

French & Italian Courses

FREN 700 Old French 

FREN 700 Old French
Introduction to grammar and structure through the reading of representative works. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 702 Provencal 
FREN 702 Provencal
Introduction to grammar and structure of the language through a reading of representative works from the Troubadour period. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 740 Medieval French Literature 
FREN 740 Medieval French Literature
Literary history of the period, with discussion of representative works read for the most part in the original old French. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 750 French Literature of the Sixteenth Century 
FREN 750 French Literature of the Sixteenth Century
A survey of the major writers, covering Rabelais, Sceve, Louise Labe, Marguerite de Navarre, Ronsard, Du Bellay, Montaigne, and d'Aubigne. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 763 French Drama of the Seventeenth Century 
FREN 763 French Drama of the Seventeenth Century
Development of baroque and classical French drama, with emphasis on Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 765 Nondramatic French Literature of the Seventeenth Century 
FREN 765 Nondramatic French Literature of the Seventeenth Century
Esthetics of baroque and classicism. Emphasis on Descartes, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, Mme de Lafayette, although other authors may be studied. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 842 Arthurian Literature in France 
FREN 842 Arthurian Literature in France
Origins and development of Arthurian legend; analysis of major texts. Prerequisite: FREN 700. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 848 Studies in Medieval French Literature: _____ 
FREN 848 Studies in Medieval French Literature: _____
Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: FREN 700. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 850 Early Renaissance Literature 
FREN 850 Early Renaissance Literature
Emphasis on Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Marot, Maurice Sceve and Louise Labe. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 858 Studies in Sixteenth Century French Literature: _____ 
FREN 858 Studies in Sixteenth Century French Literature: _____
Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


FREN 868 Studies in Seventeenth Century French Literature: _____ 
FREN 868 Studies in Seventeenth Century French Literature: _____
Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ITAL 502 Dante's Divine Comedy I 
ITAL 502 Dante's Divine Comedy I
Detailed study of Dante's masterpiece. Attention will also be given to such matters as the development of the Italian language at Dante's period and the relation of the Comedy to Dante's other works. Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Italian. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


ITAL 503 Dante's Divine Comedy II 
ITAL 503 Dante's Divine Comedy II
Continuation of ITAL 502. Prerequisite: Completion of ITAL 502. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

History of Art Courses

HA 506 Early Medieval and Romanesque Art 

HA 506 Early Medieval and Romanesque Art
This course examines the art of Europe from the Early Christian era through the Romanesque period, up to 1200. Architecture, sculpture, manuscript illumination, metalwork and painting are explored in relation to their political, religious and social contexts. Graduate students can expect to complete additional reading and writing assignments. Prerequisite: HA 100 or HA 150, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HA 507 Gothic Art 
HA 507 Gothic Art
This course examines the art of Europe during the Gothic period, from 1140-1500. Architecture, sculpture, manuscript illumination, metalwork, painting and furniture are explored in relation to their political, religious and social contexts. Graduate students can expect to complete additional reading and writing assignments. Prerequisite: HA 100 or HA 150, or permission of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HA 510 Medieval Manuscripts and Early Printed Books 
HA 510 Medieval Manuscripts and Early Printed Books
Students study the history of the book from 300 to 1500 A.D., concentrating on the role of visual imagery in books and the place of books in medieval and renaissance culture. In addition to discussing the relation between text and image, and studying the stylistic contexts for ancient, medieval, and Renaissance illumination and early woodcut illustration, participants in this course consider such additional topics as methods of book production, the development of cycles of illustration for religious and secular books, and the relationship between manuscripts and early printed books. Lectures and discussion are supplemented by visits to the fine collection of manuscripts, printed books, and facsimiles in the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Western art history at the college level, or consent of the instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Hedeman, Anne
MW 11:00-12:15 PM SRL 350 - LAWRENCE
3 68261

HA 576 Art in the Age of Rubens, Rembrandt and Vermeer: Northern Baroque 
HA 576 Art in the Age of Rubens, Rembrandt and Vermeer: Northern Baroque
Seventeenth-century art in the northern and southern Netherlands with emphasis on painting of Rubens and Rembrandt. Prerequisite: HA 100, HA 151, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HA 577 Italian Baroque Art 
HA 577 Italian Baroque Art
This course explores the history of art and architecture in Italy during the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The visual culture of the Italian Baroque is examined in terms of style, patronage, and religious or secular function. Attention is also paid to art theory, practice, gender issues, and foreign artists working in Italy, as well as to understanding and interpreting primary sources. Prerequisite: HA 100/HA 300, HA 151, or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HA 593 Special Study in Medieval Art: _____ 
HA 593 Special Study in Medieval Art: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in medieval art, including courses taken through study abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Same topic may not be taken at both the 300 and 500-levels. Prerequisite: An appropriate introductory-level course in art history, or consent of the instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Marina, Areli
MW 09:30-10:45 AM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 69449

HA 594 Special Study in Renaissance Art: _____ 
HA 594 Special Study in Renaissance Art: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Renaissance art, including courses taken through study abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Same topic may not be taken at both the 300 and 500-levels. Prerequisite: An appropriate introductory-level course in art history, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HA 595 Special Study in Baroque Art: _____ 
HA 595 Special Study in Baroque Art: _____
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Baroque art, including courses taken through study abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Same topic may not be taken at both the 300 and 500-levels. Prerequisite: An appropriate introductory-level course in art history, or consent of the instructor. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Di Resta, Jason
MW 12:30-01:45 PM SMA 208 - LAWRENCE
3 69176
LEC Stone-Ferrier, Linda
MW 11:00-12:15 PM SMA 211 - LAWRENCE
3 68259

HA 920 Seminar in Early Medieval Art: _____ 
HA 920 Seminar in Early Medieval Art: _____
A study of selected problems dealing with the art of the early Middle Ages. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. SEM.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HA 925 Seminar in Late Medieval Art: _____ 
HA 925 Seminar in Late Medieval Art: _____
A study of selected problems dealing with the art of the later Middle Ages. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. SEM.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
SEM Marina, Areli
M 02:30-05:00 PM SMA 207 - LAWRENCE
3 68281

HA 935 Seminar in Northern Renaissance Art: _____ 
HA 935 Seminar in Northern Renaissance Art: _____
A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. SEM.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HA 940 Seminar in 17th Century Art: ______ 
HA 940 Seminar in 17th Century Art: ______
A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. SEM.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
SEM Stone-Ferrier, Linda
W 02:30-05:00 PM SMA 207 - LAWRENCE
3 61059

History Courses

HIST 513 Early Medieval Culture 

HIST 513 Early Medieval Culture
The formation of a new civilization in Western Europe between the decline of the Roman Empire and the First Crusade is the central stress in this topical study of the institutions and ideas characteristic of the Latin West, 300-1100. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 515 The Crusades in Cross-Cultural Perspective 
HIST 515 The Crusades in Cross-Cultural Perspective
This course examines the development and evolution of the crusade as well as the history of the crusading movement from the 11th to the 15th centuries. Through an analysis of documents from Christian, Jewish, and Muslim perspectives, this course aims to consider "the Crusades" in the broadest possible context. One of the key questions to be addressed in this course is: how did these expeditions to the Holy Land both reflect and influence cross-cultural relations in the medieval Mediterranean World? LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 516 Later Medieval Culture 
HIST 516 Later Medieval Culture
The civilization of Medieval Europe at its height (1100-1350); its subsequent disintegration and transformation. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 519 European Intellectual History of the Seventeenth Century 

HIST 520 The Age of the Renaissance 
HIST 520 The Age of the Renaissance
A survey of economic, political, social, and cultural developments in Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries, with special attention to those elements in the life of the age which look forward to the modern world. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 521 The Age of the Reformation 
HIST 521 The Age of the Reformation
The Protestant revolt of the 16th century. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 522 The Age of Religious Wars, 1540-1648 
HIST 522 The Age of Religious Wars, 1540-1648
The Catholic or Counter-Reformation and the wars of religion, including the Thirty Years War. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 541 British History, Tudors and Stuarts 
HIST 541 British History, Tudors and Stuarts
An introduction to the impact on the British Isles of the Reformation and Renaissance; the development of the Tudor state; Parliament; the Stuart monarchy; the Anglican counter-reformation; civil war; the Cromwellian experiment. Prerequisite: A prior history course, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 545 British History from Monarchy to Democracy 
HIST 545 British History from Monarchy to Democracy
A study of Britain's recovery from civil war; state formation and national identity; ideological conflict; the Revolution of 1688; religion and secularization; social stability and commercial expansion; reform; threats to the state, and the American revolution; Britain's survival of the French Revolution; the breakdown of the ancient regime in 1828-32. Prerequisite: A prior history course, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 551 Spain and its Empire, 1450-1700 
HIST 551 Spain and its Empire, 1450-1700
This course will examine the society and culture of Spain in the period known as "the Golden Age." Subjects that will receive attention include: rural and urban society, economic and political organization of the Spanish and American peoples in the early years of the conquest, the place of women in society, the social basis for "Golden Age" culture, and the debate over the "decline of Spain. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 564 Medieval Russia 
HIST 564 Medieval Russia
Political, economic, social, cultural, and religious developments of Russia from the beginnings of the Russian state in the 9th Century through the 17th Century. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Levin, Eve
TuTh 09:30-10:45 AM WES 4008 - LAWRENCE
3 65870

HIST 587 Age of Shoguns: Early Modern Japan 
HIST 587 Age of Shoguns: Early Modern Japan
Early modern Japan (16th to 19th century) examines the history, culture, and patterns of life during an era of rigid social control but artistic brilliance. After an historical overview of the period, students will explore topics including the social structure, travel, religion, thought, and the formation of traditional cultural forms such as Kabuki theater. (Same as EALC 587.) Prerequisite: An earlier course in history or east Asian languages and cultures, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 605 Medieval Japan 
HIST 605 Medieval Japan
Course examines the history of Japan from the end of the ancient period (c. 1200 AD) through the medieval era (approximately 1573). Issues covered include the formation and destruction of the Kamakura and Muromachi warrior governments, medieval religious life and culture. Writing assignments provide students with opportunities to gain familiarity with historical methods for analysis and to strengthen their written expression. Not open to students who have taken HIST/EALC 586. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 833 Colloquium in British History, 1500-1660 
HIST 833 Colloquium in British History, 1500-1660
This course will engage with recent scholarship on the Renaissance and Reformation, the Civil War and the English Republic. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 856 Colloquium in Modern European History I - Renaissance to the French Revolution 
HIST 856 Colloquium in Modern European History I - Renaissance to the French Revolution
This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in the history of Europe between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The first in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 857 Colloquium in Modern European History II - Major Themes in Early Modern History 
HIST 857 Colloquium in Modern European History II - Major Themes in Early Modern History
This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in early modern European history. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The second in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 918 Elements of Latin Paleography 
HIST 918 Elements of Latin Paleography
Introduction to the techniques of reading, dating, and localizing medieval Latin manuscripts. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


HIST 919 Seminar in Medieval Europe 
HIST 919 Seminar in Medieval Europe
LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

Slavic Courses

SLAV 626 The Cultural Impact of Ottoman Empire on the South Slavs 

SLAV 626 The Cultural Impact of Ottoman Empire on the South Slavs
An examination of the cultural development of the South Slavs in the context of the Ottoman invasions and subsequent rule (14th-19th century), focusing on the frontier aspects of the Balkans, military culture, religion, economics and banditry, as well as other aspects of material and folk culture. No language requirement. Prerequisite: SLAV 316 or SLAV 508; or consent of instructor. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SLAV 748 Old Church Slavic 
SLAV 748 Old Church Slavic
A course in the first written language of the Slavs (9-12th centuries AD), with discussion of Indo-European, Baltic and Common Slavic background. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian or the study of another ancient Indo-European language. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SLAV 820 Old Russian Literature: Beginnings to 1700 
SLAV 820 Old Russian Literature: Beginnings to 1700
Readings of selected texts in Russian. Prerequisite: SLAV 752. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

 

Spanish & Portuguese Courses

SPAN 722 Special Topics in Spanish Literature: _____ 

SPAN 722 Special Topics in Spanish Literature: _____
The content of this course will vary, and the course may be taken more than once with full credit, provided there is no duplication in the material studied. Prerequisite: A survey course in Spanish peninsular literature taught in Spanish. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SPAN 730 Topics in the Literature of 13th- and 14th-Century Iberia: _____ 
SPAN 730 Topics in the Literature of 13th- and 14th-Century Iberia: _____
A theoretically informed study of representative works from 13th- and 14th-century Iberia. Course may be repeated for credit provided that the topic changes. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SPAN 733 Print Culture in Early Modern Spain 
SPAN 733 Print Culture in Early Modern Spain
A study of the literature produced during the period of early printed books with emphasis on the diffusion of new literary forms during the late 15th- and early 16th-centuries. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SPAN 735 Poetry and Sentimental Romance in Fifteenth-Century Castile 
SPAN 735 Poetry and Sentimental Romance in Fifteenth-Century Castile
Survey of the poetry and prose of the fifteenth century with particular attention to the literature produced during the reign of Isabel de Castilla. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SPAN 739 Topics in Early Modern Spanish Drama: _____ 
SPAN 739 Topics in Early Modern Spanish Drama: _____
Selected plays of such authors as Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderón, and Maria de Zayas. Course may be repeated for credit provided that the topic changes. LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Bayliss Jr, Robert
TuTh 02:30-03:45 PM WES 2600 - LAWRENCE
3 67877

SPAN 742 Topics in the Early Modern Spanish Prose: _____ 
SPAN 742 Topics in the Early Modern Spanish Prose: _____
From the Celestina to the middle of the seventeenth century. Course may be repeated for credit provided that the topic changes. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SPAN 744 Topics in Early Modern Spanish Poetry: _____ 
SPAN 744 Topics in Early Modern Spanish Poetry: _____
A theoretically informed study of selected works of poetry in Spanish from the 15th through 17th centuries. Course may be repeated for credit provided that the topic changes LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SPAN 745 Don Quixote 
SPAN 745 Don Quixote
Linguistic and literary study. Examination of traditional interpretations. The life and thought of Cervantes. Theoretical readings. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SPAN 792 Topics in the Picaresque Novel: _____ 
SPAN 792 Topics in the Picaresque Novel: _____
A theoretically informed study of the picaresque mode in Spanish and Spanish-American literature. Course may be repeated for credit provided that the topic changes. LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.


SPAN 961 Seminar: Medieval Literature: _____ 
SPAN 961 Seminar: Medieval Literature: _____
LEC.
Spring 2018
Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
LEC Rivera, Isidro
MW 03:00-04:14 PM WES 2600 - LAWRENCE
3 68756

SPAN 962 Seminar: Cervantes: _____ 
SPAN 962 Seminar: Cervantes: _____
LEC.

The class is not offered for the Spring 2018 semester.

 

Admission:

Current KU Students

A student must be in good standing with their graduate degree program in order to participate in the certificate program. A graduate GPA of 3.0 or higher is required for admission.  The application process entails completing the online application, payment of the $30 application fee, and submitting materials required for the Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) Certificate:

  • A C.V. or Resume
  • A personal statement declaring your interest in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) and its relationship to your graduate course of study and/or career objectives
  • An endorsement from your graduate degree program
  • A KU Advising report in lieu of an official transcript

Online Application

Non-KU students or KU Alumni 

Non-KU students or KU Alumni must have a previously completed advanced degree in an applicable field with a graduate GPA of 3.0 of higher. The application process entails completing the online application, submitting materials required for the Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) Certificate:

  • A C.V. or Resume
  • A personal statement declaring your interest in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) and its relationship to your graduate course of study and/or career objectives
  • Two letters of recommendation from persons familiar with your academic work or potential for graduate study
  • Official transcripts from any institutions where coursework related to study in Medieval and Early Modern Studies was completed

Online Application

Send official sealed transcripts to:

Graduate Admissions
1450 Jayhawk Blvd.
Strong Hall, Room 313
Lawrence, KS  66045

-OR-

graduateadm@ku.edu

Contact:

Anne D. Hedeman, Judith Harris Murphy Distinguished Professor, Department of Art History

ahedeman@ku.edu

 

 

Caroline Jewers, Associate Professor, Department of French & Italian

cjewers@ku.edu 

 

 

Cari Ann Kreienhop, Graduate Academic Advisor

ckreienhop@ku.edu


Giving

Diversity

Our Statement on Diversity in support of Rock Chalk Invisible Hawk and the University of Kansas Black Student Union’s efforts to combat racism.
The School of Languages & Cultures serves as a gateway to understanding the diversity of the world, through learning languages, literatures, and cultures, past and present. Through its research and teaching, the SLLC offers students opportunities for deep engagement with a wide range of languages, literatures, and cultures that provide the knowledge and skills to interact with and understand the world. The faculty and students who teach, research, and learn in the SLLC consider issues of diversity fundamental to all of our work. The study of others' languages, literatures, and cultures enables us to develop deep empathy and perspective informs the way that we approach issues before us, whether on a personal, local, regional, national, or global scale. Therefore take it as axiomatic that the SLLC stands for a campus that is committed to the meaningful sharing, contemplation, and discussion of ideas that emerge from multiple cultural perspectives and experiences. We continually rededicate ourselves to the principle of diversity. We strive to create an atmosphere where all students and faculty feel comfortable and welcome to express their views as well as work together to solve conflict. Further, we view our mission as a center of diversity on a flagship campus as requiring us to lead by example.

One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times
Calendar of Events